Tag Archive | "Modding"

Sony VAIO UX UMPC Gets PS3 Controller Attached, Plays Halo, Mario Kart, and More

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sony ps3 controllerWe’ve seen game controller and plenty of other great mods before for the loved but unfortunately canceled VAIO UX-series UMPC, but it looks like one person has taken the game to a whole new level by mounting a PS3 controller directly to the device.

It’s not clear exactly how the Ps3 controller is mounted to the UMPC, but it seems to be very firmly attached, and is connected to the UX via Bluetooth. The grips of the controller have been shaved off, presumably to make the rig more compact or perhaps easier to hold.

The VAIO UX is powerful for a UMPC, but definitely can’t handle intense modern games. When it comes to older emulated gaming, or less 3D intense arcade style gaming, this mod seems to work perfectly, even for an FPS (as you’ll see below).

YouTube user pochowandpoch (the creator of the mod) has a number of videos showing the rig in use playing Halo, Mario Kart, and Metal Slug, among others:

Sony Vaio Controller Mod – Halo
Sony Vaio Controller Mod–Metal Slug

There’s also a video that gives a better look at the removed grips  and how the controller attaches to the UX:

Thanks to its desktop OS running nature, and the ability to run emulators, this certainly represents one of the most versatile hand-held gaming machines in the world. Now if only Sony would quit canceling all of its innovative handheld devices….

Acer Aspire One 522 Upgrade. How-To and Tests

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Out-of-the-box, the Acer Aspire One 522 is a very decent netbook. 3D graphics and HD video support out-pace anything that’s built on an Intel platform and with a dual-core 1Ghz CPU that challenges the dual-core Atom at 1.5Ghz AND keeps the battery drain down to impressive levels, a 1280×720 screen and a reasonable build quality you have something of a bargain at 299 Euros but I wanted to see just how much I could get out of the Aspire One 522 if I pimped it out with a RAM, storage and OS upgrade. The results have been impressive; But there’s a limit.

Aspire One 522 (17)

The Acer Aspire One 522 is built on the AMD Brazos platform with the Ontario APU. The CPU is a 64-bit part and supports 4GB of RAM. In the standard build, however, it is delivered with 32bit Windows Home Starter, and 1GB RAM. Even with a RAM upgrade it is OS-restricted to 2GB of RAM usage. Clearly an upgrade to Windows Home Premium 64bit with a clean install over 4GB of RAM is the easiest way to enhance the device. I spent about 125 Euro on a Home Premium license and a 4GB RAM stick to achieve that but before I did, I took a Runcore Pro IV 64GB SSD (2.5” SATA) worth $150 and dropped it in with a copy of the standard OS build. If I was to recommend just one upgrade, this would be it. The SSD cuts boot times and application startup times in half and gives the system a much better feel all-round. Lets take a look at the results using a CrystalMark test suite.

Using CrystalMark 2003 (a simple, easy-to-run suite that I’ve been using for 5 years) I tested the stock system and came up with a respectable score all-round.

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In comparison, a Pinetrail –based netbook (Single-core 1.6Ghz) will turn in about 25K and a dual-core N550-based system like the Samsung N350 gives a similar 35K score but most of that score comes from the CPU. A 1.6Ghz dual-core Atom-based Asus Eee PC 1015PN due to be launched soon clocks in at an impressive 45K. While the AMD-based system is good, it’s not class-leading.

By dropping in the SSD though, the HDD score goes through the 100MB/s barrier and really gives the system a boost along with the scores. Here’s the CrystalMark score after the SSD upgrade and the replacement of 1GB RAM with a 4GB stick (2GB enabled in Windows Starter.)

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I was surprised to see that some of the CPU scores went up so much after the disk and memory swap and I was unable to repeat the 8270 ALU score at a later time but the important thing here is the jump in disk performance. You can see the ‘HDD’ score at 14648 and the sequential read speed at up to 108MB/s which is about double that of the original disk.

How Do you Upgrade RAM and Disk on the Acer Aspire One 522?

Before I show you the results for a fresh 64-bit Windows Home Premium install (which frees up the full 4GB of RAM) let me show you how to take apart the netbook to upgrade it. The video shows my early attempt at taking apart the device so please take note of the annotations because you don’t have to remove the outer casing screws, you don’t have to remove the two rubber feet and you don’t have to disconnect the keyboard. Be careful of the keyboard catches too. I have already broken two of mine and I’ve seen a report from someone who broke all of them meaning the keyboard would have to be stuck down permanently with glue or tape.

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Statistics are all well and good but how does the device perform in real life with a fast SSD upgrade? In the video below I show the boot-up time and startup times for some common applications. On average, boot-up and application start times are cut by half which is a huge, huge difference.

Upgrade to Windows Home Premium 64-bit (and full 4GB RAM usage)

This part of the upgrade is useful on many levels. Importantly, you get to make a fresh install of the OS without the pre-installed services and software from Acer. Secondly, Windows Home Premium opens up more Windows 7 functionality including Windows Media Center, Aero and Themes and, importantly here,  the ability to access more than 2GB of RAM.

The license cost me about 85 Euros (OEM License) and installation was made on a clean SSD from an external USB DVD drive.

Drivers for the various Acer Aspire One 522 models are available here and can be copied from a USB stick (the Wi-Fi, LAN and SD card don’t work on initial Windows 7 install.)

After install you should see this in the system settings.

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Final Performance Check.

With Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit, 4GB of RAM and the Runcore Pro IV SSD installed, here’s a rundown of performance reports starting with the impressive disk scores which rise 30% above the 2GB, 32bit scores.

creystaldisk - fresh x64 w7hp  4gb ssd

Yes, that’s a 138MB/s transfer rate, on a netbook! Importantly, the small block read speeds are excellent.

Final Crystalmark score (Note: This is a 32bit test)

crystalmark - fresh x64 w7hp  4gb ssd-2crystalmark - fresh x64 w7hp  4gb ssd

The two results were taken at different times with different Windows 7 themes.

Battery life, Noise, Heat

No differences in battery life, noise or heat were noticeable after the upgrade. There may be a measurable difference in battery life but I estimate no more than 5% gain under full-usage scenarios. Note that on the Aspire One 522, the fan is on nearly all the time. It’s relatively quite but audible in a quiet room.

4GB vs 2GB

Having 4Gb of RAM available on a netbook is somewhat of an overkill and any applications that might require such memory are also going to require more CPU processing power than is available on the platform. The recommendation would be to buy a 2GB RAM stick although the small extra cost and zero additional effort of buying a 4GB stick means you might as well do it anyway! Remember that hibernation will be much slower with 4GB of RAM than with 2GB of RAM.

32bit vs 64bit

I’m not seeing clear, end-user advantages yet on the system build here but clearly there are some 64bit-capable programs that might take advantage of it. Cinebench 10 returned 1390 points with the 64-bit version compared to 1290 with the 32bit test – a 7.5% improvement. More testing is needed here and through my ultra-mobile video editing project, I should get some more results.

cinebench10 - 64bit

Windows 7 Starter vs Windows Home Premium

At over 80-euros to enable an extra 2GB of RAM, themes and a media center, it seems a little excessive and is something that needs to be considered carefully. A clean install of Windows 7 Home Starter on a fast SSD could be a better choice unless the user is looking to get every last drop of capability out of the system.

HDD vs SSD

There’s no question that the SSD upgrade brings the best end-user improvements. SSDs can be lighter too but the user needs to be careful not to choose a slow SSD (some aren’t built for speed.) I’m currently using a Runcore Pro IV that was loaned to me.

Lightweight SSDs.

I’ve got a 32Gb SSD here (Sandisk SDSA3AD-032G loaned by Tegatech)  that weighs 9gm. Thats 100gm lighter than the pre-installed solution and would bring the weight of the 522 down to under 1.1KG which is impressive given the CPU, GPU and battery life. Worth considering.

Alternatives and weight considerations

After the upgrades, the device returns much better performance but there are alternatives out there. The Asus Eee PC 1215PN with dual-core 1.6Ghz CPU and Nvidia Ion platform offers excellent CPU and graphics performance and we expect it to be available with 2GB and Windows Home Premium (as the 1.5Ghz version is) for around the 450 Euro mark. Add the SSD to this and you’re at the same price with a much better performance. The weight is the same although you don’t get the 1280×720 screen.

Looking at 12” devices it will be interesting to see how the 1215n and 1215b compare. Weight is 200-300gm more but performance gets a big boost. The EeePC 1215b is said to be available for 450 Euros and, it the end-user is happy with 300gm more weight, could be a better buy.

If the user is looking for a good value 10” device with HD screen and future upgrade steps, the Acer Aspire One 522 represents a very good deal indeed.

Will I keep the Acer Aspire One 522?

I’ve been impressed at the ability of the AMD Brazos platform to go to 4GB RAM and 64-bit Windows. The disk controller also responds well to a fast SSD. Overall, the ‘balance’ of CPU and GPU power is also good. The advantage of going to 4GB RAM is, however, a little over-the-top for a device that really can’t be used for high-end memory intensive work that often requires high-end CPU power. What would make more sense is 4GB RAM in the higher-end Brazos platform with the dual-core 1.6Ghz ‘Zacate’ CPU and the higher-clocked GPU. If that platform can be down-clocked to a similar 1Ghz rate with the same power requirements as the 1Ghz Ontario part you will have an interesting power-efficient platform with a relatively wide dynamic range of processing capabilities. Unfortunately there are no Zacate-based device with the E-350 (Zacate) variant so you’ll have to look at 12” solutions with higher screen power requirements and a weight of 200-300gm more. If 300gm is acceptable to you then taking a closer look at the Asus EeePC 1215b will make sense.  I’m expecting better battery life and more processing power than the successful Intel-based 1215n making it a top-candidate in its class. I will use the 522 for the time being now though as going back to the single-core N270-based Gigabyte Touchnote is not an option but when the 1215b is available, it will be at the top of the list for my next purchase and test.

Component and cost details

Aspire One 522 – 299 Euros (Germany)

SSD – Runcore Pro IV 64GB 2.5” SATA (Loaned for test by My Digital Discount) – $139.99

Memory – Corsair CMSO4GX3M1A1333C9. 4GB single module. 45 Euro

OS – Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit English OEM – 83 Euros

Sony Vaio UX Get’s a Dash of Green with Keyboard LED Mod

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The fine folks over at MicroPCTalk are racking up an ever impressive list of mods for the Sony Vaio UX series.

This time around, user audioz33 has decided to trick out his UX490 with some sweet street-glow LED backlighting. All UX-series UMPCs come with a blue backlit keyboard, but it seems that audioz33 wanted his UX490 to stand out from the pack. And through a rather sweet looking modification to the keyboard’s LEDs, it definitely does:

ux490 green led keyboard

photoAudioz33 appears to have hand-soldered 26 green LEDs in place of the original blue ones. He says that the project took him around 2 hours to complete. Not bad for those of you who like to start a project and finish it the same day. Though the modder mentions that you may not wish to attempt this mod without a decent amount of soldering experience.

ux490 green leds bare If I had this done to my UX, I think I’d probably go with orange LEDs to pay homage to the Sony Clie UX-series which had an awesome thumb-board with orange backlit keys.

Modded Sony VAIO UX does everything – and then some. Is this the fastest, most versatile UMPC in the world?

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boot screen Sony might have stopped updating the VAIO UX series UMPC a while back, but the amazing guys over at MicroPCTalk certainly haven’t. In what is being championed as the masterpiece of the forum, a modded UX490 (the lastest UX model from Sony, released November 2007) features nearly every major mod that the community has come up with over the last several years. [original thread here]

  • The original 48GB SSD has been swapped out with a 128GB RunCore Pro IV SSD. runcore
  • The original Core 2 Solo U2200 @ 1.2GHz has been replaced with a much more powerful Intel Core 2 Duo U7700 @1.33GHz and is overclocked to 1.438GHz.chip-2
  • The insides have been carefully maneuver to fit the E169 Huawei terminal which offers HSDPA/UMTS (900/2100MHz) 3G data up to 7.2mbps, GSM/GPRS/EDGE (850/900/1800/1900MHz) voice calling and texting.
    sim
  • The original Intel 3945ABG WiFi card has been swapped for the Intel 4965AGN card which offers WiFi A/B/G/N and functions under OSX.intel4965agn

Pretty intense right? But wait, there’s more!

  • The UX490 quad-boots Mac OSX Leopard 10.5.7, Windows 7 Ultimate, Windows Vista Business, and Windows XP Professional (the words “incompatible software” don’t exist for this UX490.)quad boot
  • The Huawei terminal even works under OSX making it probably the smallest 3G capable Mac in town!

I’m waiting on some benchmarks and will update this post when I get them, but this UX490 is said to be able to hit 57k in Crystal Mark, which would make it the fastest UMPC in the world, and almost certainly the fastest for it’s size (524 grams/1.1 pounds).

I’m absolutely impressed with what a small but dedicated community can do with a device that they love. Honestly, who thought a computer this small would be this moddable?

Major props to everyone at MPCT who collectively worked out all of the tweaks and mods over the years which have made this possible. Huge shout-out to Ahn who pioneered the first U7600 mod, and did all of the mods on this UX490. Also a giant shout-out to MPCT forum member darkerx who endeavored to create this monster of a mobile machine.

I think we can officially dub this unit the, community created, MPCT UX590.

Maybe the guys at Sony will catch wind of this and become again interested in the UX series!

Awesome wearable computer setup is powered by Sony VAIO UX UMPC

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Another gem from the geniuses at www.micropctalk.com. MPCT forum user fiveseven808 has created a wearable computer setup using a Sony VAIO UX380 [Portal page] to power the whole thing. Fiveseven808 was kind enough to give me a good run down of the setup and some images as well.

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Components include:
Main system:

  • Battery geek: BG 14-18-60External battery (60wh)
  • Sony UX380N
    • VGA/TV/LAN Dongle
  • Motorola iDen i425 (for next-to-nothing (but half dial up speed) always-on internet access)

Input/Output:

  • Modified MyVu Crystal Head Mounted Display
  • Bluetooth enabled cellphone (text and mouse input)
  • Bluetooth stereo headset (voice input and stereo output)
  • ThinkOutside Stowaway Bluetooth Keyboard
  • Logitech Bluetooth Mouse
  • Bluetooth Frogpad (text input)

Essentially he took the MyVu headset, removed one of the eye pieces, and mounted the other to his glasses to that he could see his surroundings and the UX’s screen at the same time. The MyVu is attached to the UX through the A/V output port on the UX’s port replicator dongle. With some additional addons he provided his UX with extra battery life via an external battery, and several input methods to communicate with the UX while the rest of the kit resides within the backpack.

Unfortunately I must report that fiveseven’s UX380 recently died due to some physical failures, but I got a chance to talk to him about his initial vision for the project:

I guess my original goal was to design a prototype wearable computing system that is expandable, cheap, compact, yet powerful enough to be used as an every day computer with the possibility of having augmented reality systems and other passive information systems convey useful location based information to the user at all times.

I had a chance to speak with fiveseven and have somewhat of an interview with him that I’ll share in the near future. You’ll be able to read fiveseven’s comments on the project. I personally found this setup, and the idea behind, it very cool. Here is to hoping that he manages to track down another UX to continue his work.

Mac OS X 10.5.7 running beautifully on a Sony VAIO UX390 UMPC [video]

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vaioux_osx_10.5.7 The guys over at Micro PC Talk have had Mac OS X running on the VAIO UX series [for some time now, but a recent video by MPCT forum user perrin21 shows a UX390 running the latest version of Apple’s OS X pristinely. Perrin21 added a few nice mods to his UX390 [Portal page], including a draft-N WiFi card to connect to his/her Airport Extreme, and an Mtron SSD. Everything else on the unit is stock. The video demonstrates the general responsiveness of the OS on the unit and a fully functional, and calibrated, touchscreen. There is some web browsing action, a demo of Boxee, and Front Row, all appearing to work beautifully on the UX390. Not bad for someone who wants OS X in their pocket, am I right? Catch the video below:

Jkk shows you how to put an SSD and 3G in the Viliv S5

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viliv s5 mod While the Viliv S5 Premium Air might already come with an SSD and internal 3G, there is nothing stopping you from modding a standard Viliv S5 [Portal page] to include these premium options. Maybe you are doing it to save money? Maybe because you love to mod? Whatever the case, jkkmobile shows you how in this helpful video.

3G gets squeezed into the VAIO UX UMPC

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ux3glog It’s been a long time coming, but someone finally managed to throw some 3G into their Sony VAIO UX UMPC [3gux

User Oginger1 of MicroPCTalk has managed to put a Huawei E169G USB 3G Modem inside of his UX for internal 3G goodness. The US versions of the VAIO UX come with a built in EDGE modem, but Sony never refreshed the line with a 3G capable model. Oginger1 wasn’t even able to use the slow EDGE connection as he owns an international model (UX50) that comes with a CF slot instead of an EDGE module. He documented the process and gave a rough guide of how to do the mod (definitely not for newbies). To understand just how small the modable space inside the UX is, you should note that he had to cut out one of the back hand grips and raise it up 2mm, then epoxy it back into place to be able to squeeze the unit inside. Head over to his thread to see the whole process.

3gux2

The Dell Mini 9 gets touchable with a touchscreen mod

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We’ve seen it done to several other netbooks in the past and now it is the Dell Mini 9′s turn. Jkk points us to a video of a Dell Mini 9 [Portal page] that has been modded with a touchscreen. He says that any of the common 8.9" touchscreen kits can be used with the mod, but connecting the necessary components could be tricky. Check out a short video below:

Jkk mods the Aigo MID with 3G

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Jkk has been playing with the first MID that has world-wide availability, the Aigo P8860 [Portal page]. Being the amazing modder that he is, he has already managed to put 3G in it, and has a video demo of the MID browsing with 3G which later goes into details of the mod itself. The video which you can see below, shows various sites including YouTube playback which works great, and I am happy to see that scrolling looks to be very smooth and easy to use in the web browser. The MID manages to load Engadget quite quickly and all of this has my hopes high for MIDs to deliver the full internet experience in your pocket when they finally start ending up in consumer’s hands.

tnkgrl mods everything you need onto the Acer Aspire One

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aa1modTnkgrl has been on a modding-spree with her new Acer Aspire One [Portal page]. I noted in my review of the Aspire One that some of the important connectivity options were lacking, such as Bluetooth and 3G. Luckily smart people like tnkgrl are here to show us how we can fix some of those important but neglected components.

Moving on to part three of her Aspire One modding-spree, she shows us how to put HSDPA into the Aspire One for 3G connectivity. Amateurs be warned: this is not a simple RAM upgrade, but if you still feel up to the task, tnkgrl has provided a helpful list of steps, images, and a video of making it all happen.

Also don’t miss part one and two where you can find out how to dissemble the Aspire One, add RAM, Bluetooth, and a 1.8" HDD.

Aspire One gets modded into a slate PC

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This story made its rounds about our end of the blogosphere a few weeks ago, but after seeing someone mod a device so well, that I recently enjoyed reviewing, I couldn’t help but share it anyway.

Check out this very clean DIY project that turned an Acer Aspire One into a touch screen Slate PC:

aa1 slate aa1 slate 2

(click to see larger)

I only wish there were some videos of it in action, it looks very impressive from the images. Swing by the todoUMPC forums to see all of them.

[jkOnTheRun]



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